A simple synthetic vowel

Using Praat, we synthesise a simple vowel-like sound, starting with a pulse train, which we pass through a filter with resonant peaks.

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Sampling and quantisation

Is digital better than analogue? Here we discover that there are limitations when storing waveforms digitally. We learn that the consequence of sampling at a fixed rate is an upper limit on the frequencies that can be represented, called the Nyquist frequency. In addition to the limitations of sampling, storing each sample of the waveform as a […]

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Wave propagation on the surface of water

At the Alhambra (Granada, Spain) I saw this nice example of waves from a point source propagating in all directions at a fixed speed.

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TD-PSOLA …the hard way

Time-Domain Pitch Synchronous Overlap and Add (TD-PSOLA) can modify the fundamental frequency and duration of speech signals, without affecting the segment identity – that is, without changing the formants. Normally, it’s an automatic algorithm, but here we do it the hard way – by hand! If you want to follow-along, you will need Audacity and these materials (a […]

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My inaugural lecture

I talk about how speech synthesis works, in what I hope is a non-technical and accessible way, and finish off with an application of speech synthesis that gives personalised voices to people who are losing the ability to speak. I also try to mention bicycles as many times as possible.

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Classification and regression trees (CART)

A quick introduction to a very simple but widely-applicable model that can perform classification (predicting a discrete label) or regression (predicting a continuous value). The tree is learned from labelled data, using supervised learning. Before watching this video, you might want to check that you understand what Entropy is.

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Aliasing

Aliasing

In sampling and quantisation we saw that sampling a signal at a fixed rate means that there is an upper limit on the frequencies that can be represented. This limit is called the Nyquist frequency. Before sampling a signal, we must remove all energy above the Nyquist frequency, and here we will see what would […]

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